Nude Art or Pornography?

In the fall of 2007, American photographer Nan Goldin had one of her photographs removed from Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art in England by police stating it was a violation of their child protection act. The photograph was of young girls titled Klare and Edda belly-dancing showed one of the girls nude. Why was this newsworthy for the BBC News? It just so happened that the photograph belonged to Sir Elton John himself.

The age old debate between what is art and what is pornographic continues to exist regarding the nude. This is nothing new as artists have always walked a tightrope between artistic impression and what was held socially and culturally as offensive. Whether it was during the rise of Christianity in Medieval times or it is more recently where lines between government and religion are blurred, the question remains a matter of debate.

Legislators struggle with how to define the criteria of pornography without over-stepping the boundaries of censorship. The First Amendment to protect the right of free speech and expression must be protected to the utmost degree. However, at what point does the nude go beyond the scope of expression? Some legislation defines this as the point where a nude form becomes dehumanizing and degrading. But who makes this determination?

In some circles, citizens who fight for pornographic protection have limited views of what is justifiably called art. In a broader sense, allowances for child images of the nude are even more restricted. There is a sentiment among many that if it looks like it could be pornography and feels uncomfortable, then it probably is. This is a “better to be safe than sorry” type of approach, but clearly a common one.

In visiting many blogs on the subject, a different sentiment is portrayed. The focus in this setting is not as much on the image or art, but on the viewer. While one nude piece may be viewed by one as a glorification of the nude body in an artistic light, another may become sexually aroused. Therefore, the “uncomfortable” feeling of being sexually aroused defines the answer to the question, not the image itself.

Obviously this makes the distinction less clear between nude art and pornography since we each have different perceptions and viewpoints. An objective definition states that pornographic material is erotic in nature with intent to cause sexual arousal. The Greek basis for the word stems for “writing about prostitutes.” In contrast nude simply is defined as naked which is also its Latin derivative.

So in essence, the difference is in the material’s intent. But whose intent? The intent of the artist or pornographer, or the intent of the viewer in what they want to capture? In today’s society where paranoia runs rampant about many social injustices, the nude offers another opportunity to restrict expression and art under an umbrella of pornographic intent. Despite this being an age-old question, its relevance is always present.

The bottom line is that what results in sexual arousal for one person may not for another; also, what may be artistic to an art enthusiast may not be to someone more concrete. It does not matter if it is online or in a famous gallery. What matters is the intent and the degree of abstractness of the work. It appears this is a question we each must individually determine rather than letting society define for us all.

French Postcards – The Naughty Victorian Nude

Well, it’s no wonder that the minute the camera got invented, around the 1830’s or thereabouts, the nude gal made her appearance. And thus, in my opinion, the pin up girl was born! At first these Victorian nude “pin up” photos were called artist’s models, and they were sold mainly for that purpose. However it didn’t take long for the Victorian gentlemen to catch on, and there you have it, the vintage erotic is born.

I could say that pin up art had its beginnings much earlier, as artists have been depicting the idealized female nude in painting and sculpture for hundreds of years. That may be a matter of opinion.

However there is no doubt that the minute that camera came along these Victorian nude ladies were no longer ethereal goddesses and allegorical figures. They were contemporary women, quite often staring straight at the viewer, and wearing contemporary clothing and lingerie. This was very scandalous! Suddenly the viewer had this intimate keyhole glimpse at real scantily clad pin up girls!

The French began to exploit this new pinup photography idea very early on, and began to mass produce these vintage erotic nudes. They never were actually sent through the mail, however they were called postcards because of their convenient size. They were sold and collected in sets. As early as the civil war soldiers were caught with these risque pin up girl daguerreotypes.

In addition many Parisian prostitutes during this era would have the postcards made with images of themselves, and would use the postcards as advertisements for their services.

The heyday of the sexy art of the French postcard was approximately from 1900 through the 1920’s, and tourists from all over the world would return from France with these naughty souvenirs, this vintage pinup photography!

Stacy Lande is a Los Angeles based artist, and her pin up art is most often placed in the lowbrow category. Her book, THE RED BOX, from Last Gasp press, features introductions from Robert Williams and Frank Kozik. Stacy has had a lifelong obsession with pin up girls, and her erotic paintings explore the more allegorical side of pinups. Her subjects are femme fatales and devil girls, and her fascination with the succubus has prompted her work to be described as “predatory pinups”. Stacy’s paintings have been featured in magazine articles, notably Juxtapoz, Detour, and Hot Rod Deluxe; films, notably Gone in 60 Seconds starring Angelina Jolie and Nicholas cage; and art books, such as Weirdo Deluxe, from Chronicle Books, and Vicious, Delcious, and Ambitious, from Schiffer Books.

2 Steps to Perfecting This Season’s Nude Lip

Yes, the temps are climbing and that means less is more, and in the case of beauty and fashion, less is more no matter what you do or what you wear. When it comes to beauty, the term nude is not just for the risqué anymore, nude on the face is big, big, big. And just think, when you are going all out with the summer bling, the summer dress, the summer shoes, the summer EVERYTHING, simplifying things on your face will not only make your routine a little bit easier, but nude lips will really polish off your look in a beautiful, elegant manner.

Wearing your lips nude is not only chic, but fashion forward. It will immediately shift attention to your eyes so you can go big on the eyes without feeling like you are going overboard. Not only that, but you can’t help but notice that nude lips has been a trend for many seasons now meaning, perfect it now because this is a look that will be here to stay for some time. How do you do it? Lip liner is going to make all the difference here.

Tools – lip liner in a color only slightly darker than your lips, nude lipstick

Step 1 – Line your lips in a color that is one shade darker than your lips. What you are doing here is creating a distinct boundary between your mouth and the rest of your face so that your nude lips don’t blend in with the rest of your face.

Step 2 – Apply your lipstick, as you normally would. In the spring and summer months you can also get away with lip gloss, and you may want to try out a new personal fave, Cover Girl Outlast Lip Color. This is a color that will stay put even if you don’t. Nude Color 000 from Cover Girl is a color that will look fabulous on every single skin tone. Go for it.

Beauty Tip – Try dusting some translucent powder on your lips before applying lipstick or gloss. This will give your color a little more staying powder, and lessen the chances of any feathering or bleeding.

What is the Best Way to Make a Girl Orgasm! Here are Stunning Tricks You Just Can’t Miss at All

Guys are physically attracted towards a girl in the sense that if they see a nude girl that is good enough for them. Once they are on the bed with the girl, many men do the mistake of hurrying up things. They immediately want to get into the act which women are actually not prepared for. For women sex is more in the mind rather than the body.

Draw her in attention-

Give her a nice cuddle that can make her feel very comfortable. A nice hug and kiss is what should follow next.

Kissing gently-

Kissing is very important to attract the attention of the girl towards you. Warm hugs should follow the kissing and read her body language after this. Always proceed after analyzing her behavior. Give her what she wants.

Shower her with Compliments-

Women by nature like to be showered with compliments and gifts. Therefore if you want her to get an orgasm fast the best thing would be to shower compliments. In this way you can get the best out of the situation and be effective. If the girl senses that the compliments are genuine then the passion towards you will double.

Give her the comfort-

The girl should be very comfortable if she has to get orgasm faster. This is possible only if she experiences the right level of comfort with you. So you need to take care of that. The real fun of spending time with a girl enhances if you take efforts to give her lot of comfort when she is with you. The more the level of comfort the faster is the orgasm.

It is indeed a pleasure to make a girl orgasm. You will also be very excited to do this more for her when she is enjoying.

Live Nude Girls Unite

In the fall of 1999, the old fashioned sign for the Capitol Theater in Olympia, Washington displayed: LIVE! NUDE! GIRLS! UNITE! At first glance one might think it was going to be a show of sex workers dancing for a curious audience. The line of people gathered in the front of the theater to buy their tickets wrapped around the corner. Some came from as far away as California and Alaska to view a rough cut video filmed, produced, and directed by a stripper from the Lusty Lady in San Francisco. Julia Quiery helped the Lusty Lady become the first unionized strip club in the country and she wanted others to know how it was done.

On a daily basis for four years Julia Quiery and other women at the Lusty Lady were subjected to racism; only one woman of color could be on stage at the same time, and it was a given that “busty blondes” were the most popular dancers. There were scheduling issues that led to employee financial difficulties; each dancer could only work 16 hours a week and no more than two shows in a row. Exploitation was lurking behind every corner. The peep show booths were one way, so the dancers couldn’t see if the person watching them had a camera. Some women ended up on the Internet, others in low class porn movies.

Confronted with dancers’ concerns about the photographs and subsequent demands that the one-way mirrors be removed, the theater initially responded by dismissing dancer concerns as frivolous. Upset dancers approached the Service Employees International Union. Once they were able to convince union representatives they were serious in their desire to form a union, organizing began in earnest.

After a year of union organizing, and five months of often bitter contract negotiations, the Exotic Dancers Union Employees provided what the dancers asked for. The contract guaranteed work shifts for the 70-75 dancers, protection against arbitrary discipline and termination, automatic hourly wage increases, sick days, a contracted procedure for pursuing grievances against management, and removal of one-way mirrors from peep show booths. Thirty cashiers and janitors won increased wages and improved health benefits.

Working with the Lusty Lady dancers was definitely an eye-opening experience for people at SEIU, according to Batey. “Before we began organizing at the Lusty,” she says, “people had no knowledge of the demographics of the dancers. We found that there were lots of college students, women who were well-educated politically as well as academically, who were articulate feminists, who were concerned about the larger issues, who addressed issues from a societal viewpoint.”

In an election in August of 1997, employees at the Lusty Lady voted overwhelmingly for union representation. The theater responded by engaging the legal services of a law firm widely known for effectively and aggressively fighting unions. Negotiations preceded slowly, much to the frustration of the SEIU and the dancers, as the opposing lawyers designated five separate attorneys as their negotiating representatives.

When the theater fired one dancer (Summer, a single mother), allegedly to intimidate other dancers, the women responded angrily with a wildcat strike and protest outside the theater. A management lockout of all dancers for two-and-a-half days hurt the protesters financially, but failed to end the protest or break the unity of the dancers. Finally the theater relented, rehired the fired dancer, and began negotiating with the union seriously.

According to Batey, there has been an outpouring of interested response from the national press, including The New York Times, The Economist, Associated Press, and United Press International. Batey notes that since contract ratification, Lusty owners have been cooperative with the union and seem anxious to re-educate their managers in the whys and wherefores of the new industrial order. Show managers who couldn’t believe that they are now required to give union representatives the opportunity to talk with each new person hired have been reminded that this is indeed part of the new contract. An interim grievance procedure provided for in the contract has been working well, according to Batey, and the first post-ratification meeting to deal with grievances was reciently scheduled — at the theater’s initiative, which Batey also sees as a good sign. Federal mediators were being brought in to train both management and employees on the nuts and bolts of the new contractual arrangement, also at the theater’s request.

While the Lusty Lady contract may be the first contemporary labor agreement in the U.S. to cover strippers, it is unlikely to be the last. Before the San Francisco contract vote — indeed, even before the dancers had voted in favor of union representation — the Lusty Lady’s other theater in Seattle had taken note of the changing labor landscape. The theater began encouraging dancers to attend company-sponsored employee meetings on paid company time. Non-union employee representatives elected at these meetings were recognized by theater management as spokeswomen for the group, presumably to show dancers that the theater was interested in being responsive to their concerns and to discourage them from unionizing.

Following ratification of the San Francisco contract, members of the San Francisco organizing committee traveled to Seattle where they met with Lusty Lady dancers. They explained to them for the first time, from the dancers’ perspective, what the new union and contract were about, and how the new agreement would affect dancers in Seattle. In particular, they assured the Seattle dancers that the traditional arrangement, under which dancers could travel back and forth between the two theaters, working at both, would be maintained. Seattle theater management responded to the visit from the San Francisco organizers with an immediate, unsolicited, dollar-an-hour pay increase for all dancers. A controversial theater policy requiring dancers with tattoos or piercing to cover their body decorations while performing was also revoked.

San Francisco dancers at the Market Street Cinema and New Century Theaters have reportedly approached SEIU about possible union representation, and Batey says she has heard of possible union organizing of strippers in Houston, Texas, as well.

First I would like to say a personal thank you for taking the time to read this article. I hope you enjoyed reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it. My interests vary from character sketches, slivers of insight into my life, stories about animals and nature, and more. If you have an interesting idea for a story, but can’t seem to get your ideas to fit into form, please contact me and we can work on your story together. I love to brainstorm, and talk-story with people who also appreciate the craft of writing.